Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

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Shortly before the election ofa man came upon a plantation near Marlin, Texas, some 20 miles southeast of Waco.

Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

Though nobody knew who he was, the plantation owner took him in as a guest. Inthe FWP began collecting interviews with former slavesamassing thousands of s of oral histories which, though often filtered through the racism of white interviewers and their supervisors, provide an invaluable snapshot of how more than 2, survivors of slavery lived and thought. Nearly 40 of those interviewed claimed Abraham Lincoln visited their plantation shortly before or during the Civil War.

They said he came in disguise as a beggar or a peddler, bummed free meals off his unsuspecting white hosts, snooped around to find out what slavery was like, and told the slaves they would soon be free. In fact, as late as the s, African Americans in the South Carolina Sea Islands claimed that Lincoln traveled there in to announce the Emancipation Proclamation in person; some even said they knew the exact tree under which he stood.

Today, historical debates over emancipation often focus on whether it came from the top down or the bottom up — did Lincoln free the slaves, or did the slaves free themselves? Did they need Lincoln?

Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

He had to come down South and get his hands dirty. Some even described him as taking on the guise of the trickster popular in black folklore, a sort of Brer Rabbit in a top hat.

Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

African Americans were understandably wary of associating Lincoln too closely with their emancipation. Doing so, after all, implied freedom was a gift from a benevolent white man that could be easily taken away. African Americans were not foolish enough to think their welfare would be the utmost concern of a white politician. In the stories of Lincoln coming down South, he was rarely concerned first and foremost with the welfare of black people. In one storyfor example, his animosity toward the slaveholding class was seemingly motivated by a perceived insult rather than a moral opposition to slavery.

Lincoln had supposedly visited a plantation in Jefferson County, Arkansas, asking for work. If the enslaved people of the South needed Lincoln, then he needed them too. He attended nightly prayer meetings held by slaves in secret. He asked them what their lives were like and what they needed from him.

Like Brer Rabbit, and indeed like most slaves, the Lincoln in these stories often had to resort to guile and deception in order to get what he wanted.

Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

In onefor example, Lincoln, disguised as a peddler, came upon some white women sitting on a porch in North Carolina. By behaving like a trickster from black folklore, Lincoln was aling—or rather, black storytellers were aling—his solidarity with African Americans.

Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

To that end, Lincoln also often duped his white hosts into giving him food. Of course, these stories about Lincoln were told within a specific historical context. The people interviewing the former slaves were employees of the federal government, and most of them were white. Many were members of groups like the United Daughters of the Confederacywhich valorized the Lost Cause. Some were even descendants of folks who owned the very people they were interviewing.

Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

Survivors of slavery had every reason to believe their white interviewers would present their stories in a way that bolstered white supremacy. And telling a quaint story about Abraham Lincoln was a clever and relatively safe way to push back against that.

Using Lincoln was especially powerful at a time when many Americans had co-opted Lincoln as an icon of white supremacy. The blockbuster film The Birth of a Nationin addition to denouncing emancipation and venerating the Klan, depicted Lincoln as an enemy of the radical abolitionists and suggested that, had he lived, he would have supported immediate reunion with the South at the expense of black civil rights.

In general, white Americans celebrated Lincoln in a way that made the Civil War a story about white people. They spoke of Lincoln in the same breath as Robert E. Lee, considering them both American heroes. Such a sentimental reunion of North and South was, of course, a primarily white affair. This was not how survivors of slavery understood their relationship to Lincoln.

He made fools out of slaveholders and urged black people to fight.

Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

But they were still kin. At a time when many Americans were remaking Lincoln into a symbol of white supremacy and erasing black people from the story of the Civil War altogether, survivors of slavery were saying, through their stories of Lincoln coming down South, that they could not be erased.

Popular Latest. The Atlantic Crossword. In Subscribe. He shook Newman's hand and called on the white population to free their slaves.

Lookin for a submissive female in lincoln

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Abraham Lincoln's Secret Visits to Slaves