Love in chartley castle

Added: Jerimie Chiesa - Date: 14.10.2021 14:13 - Views: 17334 - Clicks: 2628

Staffordshire might not be the first place you think of when it comes to castles, but there are certainly enough to keep you busy for a few days. Some of these castles are private, but if you get your timing right you use to be able to visit them on a private tour — but this is something which might have changed in the last few years.

Love in chartley castle

Either way, even if you are still doubting about visiting Staffordshire, you really should come visit one day. This scenic landlocked county is one that is filled with green, leafy landscapes and sleepy villages and market towns. Here are the best castles in Staffordshire! The site has been fortified since Saxon times, with the original castle dating from the 12th century!

You might have heard of this castle under a different name though, it is also known as Alverton Castle or Aulton Castle but these are obviously the same castle. Over the centuries, the castle took on a more Gothic architectural style, particularly during the 19th century, where the famous Love in chartley castle architect, Augustus Pugin undertook the challenge of renovation and clearly did a very good job! He did this as the 16th Earl of Shrewsbury wanted it as his own country house in There was actually a school on site at this time, but it was taken over by the Sisters of Mercy in and the presbytery became their convent.

The castle remained a private residence until when the Sisters of Mercy brought it to extend their boarding school. The school closed in and the castle was left empty until the Archdiocese of Birmingham purchased the building in and opened it as a Catholic Youth Retreat Centre in Where: Alton When: 12th century Open for visit: No, check here for information. It was built in the late 13th century on the site of the Anglo-Saxon manor and is one of the few remaining castles in England that is surrounded by a moat, so I really hope that this is a castle that we can look after properly, it would be a shame if something happened.

It was once the home to the Wedgwood family, boasting 18 bedrooms, 9 reception rooms, 13 bathrooms, a library, billiard room and even a dungeon all set within 20 acres of land. It was sold though for an undisclosed fee having been on the market for years as confirmed by the estate agent Jackson-Steps. This castle use to open once a year, but I think since the last visit people were noisy and basically not on their best behaviour the person who owns this castle has decided not to open it to the public since. Which is a shame, as I would love to visit this one.

But even so, from afar, you can still tell that Chartley has large scale ruins and certainly an interesting past! It was briefly a place of imprisonment for Mary, Queen of Scots and I love that connection, knowing that a Queen was present hundreds Love in chartley castle years ago even if the circumstances were dire as it was last stop before her execution. But I think because of the history of this castle you should definitely drive near it! To give you a brief idea of what the castle looks like since we can only see if from afar and from pictures.

The motte and bailey castle is in ruins, but substantial remains stand including an unusual cylindrical keep, a curtain wall flanked by two D-shaped towers, a twin-towered gatehouse and an angled tower. Where: Near Stowe-by-Chartley When: 12th century Open for visit: No, guided tour might be available once a year if lucky. Eccleshall castle might not be the most exciting castle to visit, but it certainly has an interesting history. In June the castle was besieged by Sir William Brereton and his Parliamentary forces encamped around the church.

Their guns caused considerable damage to the walls but the castle held out, with Bishop Robert Wright sheltering within. When the Parliamentary forces finally took the castle on August 30 they found that the bishop had died of a heart attack during the siege and most of the defenders were either drunk or had gone into town drinking in the taverns. The castle was slighted to prevent future use as a stronghold but enough of the building, including an unusual nine-sided tower, together with the moat walls and medieval Love in chartley castle, remained to be used as a prison for Royalist gentry.

The castle and its grounds were confiscated and sold, but bought back again by the diocese. Where: Eccleshall When: 13th century Open for visit: No, but the gardens do open occasionally. This is an ancient fortress that is situated in the heart of the town of Stafford in Staffordshire. It has a rich, fascinating and magically history that has kept people coming back to explore this castle. The origins of the castle date bate to s, where a wooden castle was constructed by Robert de Stafford, who was a Norman magnate. But by the 15th century, the castle had been completely modernised and was entirely in stone — it was resided in numerous royals and nobles and was central to several historic battles.

Unfortunately, by the 18th century the castle fell into ruin, although it was partially rebuilt in in the Gothic Revival style.

Love in chartley castle

Rebuilt by the Jerningham family in the early 19th Century using the same foundations the keep was again a magnificent four storey structure. However, given over to caretakers and then abandoned again Love in chartley castle the s it became derelict once more. Now the castle is open to the public and it gives visitors a fascinating insight into the years of history of this important site! The site itself extends to over 26 acres and consists of Keep, inner bailey, outer bailey, woodland, herb garden, visitor centre and car park. The Keep is open to the public during Visitor Centre opening hours.

Where: Stafford When: 13th century Open for visit: Yes, grounds are open all year round, but please check the opening hours for inside the keep. This castle is also known as the lost castle! The estate dates back to the 12th century, when Stourton was a royal hunting lodge. During the 14 th and 15 th centuries, the family did very well and built up cash reserves through good marriages and military service in France.

When Lord Stourton died inhis son, Charles, inherited the estate. A feud grew up between the men and eventually in Lord Stourton kidnapped William and his son John, murdered them and buried their bodies in a cellar within the Castle. He believed he could get away with the murders, but when the castle was searched, the bodies were found, and Charles was arrested, convicted and executed in Salisbury.

A really interesting history really, although very morbid. Despite searching, nothing has been found… You can find out more about locating Stourton Castle here. This is a castle that dates back to the s, during the aftermath of the Norman Conquest of England; it originally functioned as the residence of the Mercian Kings during the Anglo-Saxon era, though during the Viking invasions that followed, it Love in chartley castle into disrepair and was abandoned.

It was later refortified by the Normans, at which it was enlarged and modernized and it is certainly an impressive castle. Not just because of its history, but because it is famous for being one of the most well-preserved historic motte and bailey castles in the country! Interestingly though, if we went back tothis castle might not have made the list though, as boundaries were changed in this year, and the castle was within the edge of Warwickshire whilst the town belonged to Staffordshire!

It is a largely ruined medieval castle at Tutbury, in the ownership of the Duchy of Lancaster. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. This castle was occupied since the Stone Age, and the castle was first recorded in as one of the new castles built to stamp the authority of the Norman conquerors across the Midlands. Since then, the castle has played an important part in English history on many occasions, in warfare and in peace.

Love in chartley castle

Seat of the de Ferrers family and later of the earls and dukes of Lancaster, Tutbury was also one of the great centres of power in medieval England. It was visited by many English kings, and home to the great John of Gaunt, 2nd Duke of Lancaster, who established a great annual feast. This tradition lasted for hundreds of years. It also had its bloodier side, as it was besieged, destroyed and rebuilt several times. The destruction was incomplete, leaving the dramatic ruins that we see today, and the castle has never been completely abandoned.

Love in chartley castle

Sincethe castle has taken on a new life, welcoming thousands of Love in chartley castle every year. So there you have it! Eight castles in Staffordshire which are absolutely fascinating. People often go straight to Wales for castles, but really, they need to come to Staffordshire, just once, to enjoy the history of this place! Like Liked by 1 person. Like Like. Wow never knew about these castles. I have been to Stafford castle. When things are better will try to visit some other castles.

Thanks for sharing. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google. You are commenting using your Twitter. You are commenting using your Facebook. Notify me of new comments via. Notify me of new posts via. Where: Alton When: 12th century Open for visit: No, check here for information 2.

Where: Caverswall When: 13th century Open for visit: No 3. Chartley Castle This castle use to open once a year, but I think since the last visit people were noisy and basically not on their best behaviour the person who owns this castle has decided not to open it to the public since. Where: Near Stowe-by-Chartley When: 12th century Open for visit: No, guided tour might be available once a year if lucky 4.

Eccleshall Castle Eccleshall castle might not be the most exciting castle to visit, but it certainly has an interesting history. Where: Eccleshall When: 13th century Open for visit: No, but the gardens do open occasionally 5. Stafford Castle Finally! A castle on the list that you can actually visit without any real issues! Where: Stafford When: 13th century Open for visit: Yes, grounds are open all year round, but please check the opening hours for inside the keep 6.

Stourton Castle This castle is also known as the lost castle! Where: Stourton When: 12th century Open for visit: No 7. Tamworth Castle This is a castle that dates back to the s, during the aftermath of the Norman Conquest of England; it originally functioned as the residence of the Mercian Kings during the Anglo-Saxon era, though during the Viking invasions that followed, it fell into disrepair and was abandoned.

Where: Tamworth When: 11th century Open for visit: Yes 8.

Love in chartley castle

Tutbury Castle Another one that you can actually visit! Have you been lucky enough to visit any of these castles? Rate this:. Share this: Twitter Facebook Pinterest. Like this: Like Loading Xx Like Liked by 1 person.

Love in chartley castle

The Tamworth border was a new thing for as well! Very interesting though! Leave a Reply Cancel reply comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:.

Love in chartley castle

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Love in chartley castle

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Best Resorts Near Chartley Castle, Stafford, England